Floral biology and pistil receptivity of the drumstick tree (Moringa oleifera Lam.)

Authors

  • Junjie Zhang 1. State Key Laboratory for Conservation and Utilization of Subtropical Agro-Bioresources South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, 510642; 2. Guangdong Key Laboratory for Innovative Development and Utilization of Forest Plant Germplasm, Guangzhou, 510642; 3. Guangdong Province Research Center of Woody Forage Engineering Technology, Guangzhou, 510642; 4. College of Forestry and Landscape Architecture, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, 510642 http://orcid.org/0000-0003-4239-9905
  • Mengfei Lin 1. State Key Laboratory for Conservation and Utilization of Subtropical Agro-Bioresources South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, 510642; 2. Guangdong Key Laboratory for Innovative Development and Utilization of Forest Plant Germplasm, Guangzhou, 510642; 3. Guangdong Province Research Center of Woody Forage Engineering Technology, Guangzhou, 510642; 4. College of Forestry and Landscape Architecture, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, 510642 http://orcid.org/0000-0001-5355-6318
  • Hanbin Chen 1. State Key Laboratory for Conservation and Utilization of Subtropical Agro-Bioresources South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, 510642; 2. Guangdong Key Laboratory for Innovative Development and Utilization of Forest Plant Germplasm, Guangzhou, 510642; 3. Guangdong Province Research Center of Woody Forage Engineering Technology, Guangzhou, 510642; 4. College of Forestry and Landscape Architecture, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, 510642 http://orcid.org/0000-0002-2963-6737
  • Qin Zhu School of Life Science, Jiaying University, Meizhou, 514015 http://orcid.org/0000-0003-3591-4518
  • Vu Ngoc linh 1. State Key Laboratory for Conservation and Utilization of Subtropical Agro-Bioresources South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, 510642; 2. Guangdong Key Laboratory for Innovative Development and Utilization of Forest Plant Germplasm, Guangzhou, 510642; 3. Guangdong Province Research Center of Woody Forage Engineering Technology, Guangzhou, 510642; 4. College of Forestry and Landscape Architecture, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, 510642 http://orcid.org/0000-0002-1090-3997
  • Xiaoyang Chen 1. State Key Laboratory for Conservation and Utilization of Subtropical Agro-Bioresources South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, 510642; 2. Guangdong Key Laboratory for Innovative Development and Utilization of Forest Plant Germplasm, Guangzhou, 510642; 3. Guangdong Province Research Center of Woody Forage Engineering Technology, Guangzhou, 510642; 4. College of Forestry and Landscape Architecture, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, 510642 http://orcid.org/0000-0002-4780-3906

Keywords:

Moringa oleifera Lam., stigma, style, stigmatic receptivity, ultrastructure

Abstract

Drumstick (Moringa oleifera Lam.) has a wide range of uses due to its high nutritional value and the high oil content of its seeds. Many aspects of its reproductive biology remain poorly understood. We investigated the floral morphology of drumstick, its stigma receptivity and the structural and cytochemical features of the stigma and style at different developmental stages. The inflorescences are panicles of hermaphroditic flowers, with a pistil consisting of one open-type stigma and a hollow stylar canal. Stigma receptivity was assayed based on pollen germination, pollen tube growth and fruit set following artificial pollination. Flowers at later developmental stages exhibited greater stigma receptivity, higher percentages of pollen germination and a higher fruit set than those in earlier stages. Enhanced stigma receptivity was associated with increased amounts of insoluble polysaccharides, lipids and proteins in the canal cells at later developmental stages. An ultrastructural study of the cells lining the canal indicated that they were secretory cells containing an enlarged endoplasmic reticulum, dictyosomes, mitochondria, plastids and ribosomes. Post-anthesis, these organelles exhibited degeneration at the end of the secretory phase. This study provides an important contribution to current knowledge of the anatomy and ultrastructure of the style and stigma in drumstick.

https://doi.org/10.2298/ABS170205046Z

Received: February 5, 2017; Revised: April 10, 2017; Accepted: May 8, 2017; Published online: November 20, 2017

How to cite this article: Zhang J, Lin M, Chen H, Zhu Q, Linh VN, Chen X. Floral biology and pistil receptivity of the drumstick tree (Moringa oleifera Lam.). Arch Boil Sci. 2018;70(2):299-305.

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Published

2018-04-27

How to Cite

1.
Zhang J, Lin M, Chen H, Zhu Q, linh VN, Chen X. Floral biology and pistil receptivity of the drumstick tree (Moringa oleifera Lam.). Arch Biol Sci [Internet]. 2018Apr.27 [cited 2022Sep.29];70(2):299-305. Available from: https://www.serbiosoc.org.rs/arch/index.php/abs/article/view/1454

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