Effects of increased proliferation of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells by sphingosylphosphorylcholine on the survival of cryopreserved fat grafts

Authors

  • Yong Chan Bae Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Busan
  • Ji Sun Song Research Institute for Convergence of Biomedical Science and Technology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan, Gyeongsangnam-do
  • Kyeong Wook Nam Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Busan
  • Joo Hyoung Kim Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Busan
  • Su Bong Nam 1. Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan, Gyeongsangnam-do; 2. Research Institute for Convergence of Biomedical Science and Technology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan, Gyeongsangnam-do

Keywords:

human adipose-derived stem cell (hADSC), sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC), cryopreservation, fat, angiogenesis

Abstract

Paper description:

  • The use of cryopreserved adipose tissue for soft tissue augmentation is common, but the unpredictability of fat graft viability remains a limitation.
  • We demonstrated the effects of human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSC) plus sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) on the survival of cryopreserved fat grafts in BALB/c male nude mice. The hADSC+SPC group showed higher survival rate in terms of weight and volume than the control or hADSC group. The hADSC+SPC treatment significantly increased the expression of angiogenic factors.
  • These results point to the potential clinical benefit of hADSC+SPC.


Abstract: The use of cryopreserved adipose tissue for soft-tissue augmentation is common, but the unpredictability of fat graft viability remains a limitation. Human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSC) have been introduced to enhance viability and improve the survival of transplanted fat tissue. Sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) is a bioactive lipid molecule involved in various cellular responses. SPC stimulates the proliferation of various cell types such as hADSC. We demonstrated the effects of hADSC and SPC on the survival of cryopreserved fat grafts in nude mice. The cryopreserved fat grafts were treated with hADSC or hADSC+SPC, and a normal saline (control) mixture in BALB/c male nude mice. We examined the weight and volume of the mice in each group (n=11) at 8 weeks after transplantation to evaluate the survival of the fat tissue. The hADSC group showed increased weight and volume compared with the control group. The hADSC+SPC group showed a higher survival rate in terms of weight and volume than the control or hADSC group. In addition, the hADSC+SPC treatment significantly increased the expression of angiogenic factors. These results suggest the potential clinical utility of hADSC+SPC.

https://doi.org/10.2298/ABS180220015B

Received: February 20, 2018; Revised: April 12, 2018; Accepted: April 13, 2018; Published online: April 17, 2018

How to cite this article: Bae YC, Song JS, Nam KW, Kim JH, Nam SB. Effects of increased proliferation of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells by sphingosylphosphorylcholine on the survival of cryopreserved fat grafts. Arch Biol Sci. 2018;70(3):…

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Published

2018-08-20

How to Cite

1.
Bae YC, Song JS, Nam KW, Kim JH, Nam SB. Effects of increased proliferation of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells by sphingosylphosphorylcholine on the survival of cryopreserved fat grafts. Arch Biol Sci [Internet]. 2018Aug.20 [cited 2022May29];70(3):543-9. Available from: https://www.serbiosoc.org.rs/arch/index.php/abs/article/view/2612

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