The antihemostatic profile of vitamin C: Mechanisms that underlie the technical application of a physiological molecule

Authors

  • Plínio C Sathler 1. Universidade Federal Fluminense, Hospital Universitário Antônio Pedro, Programa de Pós-Graduação Patologia, Centro, CEP 24033-900, Niterói, RJ; 2. Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Faculdade de Farmácia, Cidade Universitária, CEP 21541-590, Rio de Janeiro, RJ
  • André L Lourenço Universidade Federal Fluminense, Hospital Universitário Antônio Pedro, Programa de Pós-Graduação Patologia, Centro, CEP 24033-900, Niterói, RJ
  • Max S Saito Universidade Federal Fluminense, Hospital Universitário Antônio Pedro, Programa de Pós-Graduação Patologia, Centro, CEP 24033-900, Niterói, RJ
  • Ana P G Arêas Universidade Federal Fluminense, Hospital Universitário Antônio Pedro, Programa de Pós-Graduação Patologia, Centro, CEP 24033-900, Niterói, RJ
  • Carlos R Rodrigues Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Faculdade de Farmácia, Cidade Universitária, CEP 21541-590, Rio de Janeiro, RJ
  • Lúcio M Cabral Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Faculdade de Farmácia, Cidade Universitária, CEP 21541-590, Rio de Janeiro, RJ
  • Helena C Castro Universidade Federal Fluminense, Hospital Universitário Antônio Pedro, Programa de Pós-Graduação Patologia, Centro, CEP 24033-900, Niterói, RJ
  • Hye C Kang Universidade Federal Fluminense, Hospital Universitário Antônio Pedro, Programa de Pós-Graduação Patologia, Centro, CEP 24033-900, Niterói, RJ

Abstract

The potential of antioxidants as tools for decreasing the incidence of diseases, including cardiovascular events, is of growing interest. Some antioxidants (e.g. vitamin E and acetyl-salicylic acid) have been described as effective on cardiovascular diseases with mechanisms that differ from other scavenging agents. Currently, vitamin C is used to open occluded long-term central venous catheters, which avoids the process of reinserting a new one and injuring the patient. In this work, we investigated the vitamin C antihemostatic profile by evaluating its effects on the coagulation process. We used different assays, including prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), thrombin time (TT) and ancrod time tests. We also examined the overall pH disturbance caused by vitamin C at different concentrations and its effect on the thrombin-initiated fibrin polymerization assay. Our results revealed a significant anticoagulant activity of vitamin C at high plasma concentrations (surpassing the normal 100 μmol/L ratio) in a cell-independent mechanism. Our results suggest that vitamin C may affect blood coagulation by a direct impairment of fibrin assembly and further formation of a cohesive clot microstructure. This study supports the literature that points to the antihemostatic ability of antioxidant agents, and clarifies the mechanism of vitamin C in opening occluded long-term central venous catheters.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Downloads

Published

2016-06-27

How to Cite

1.
Sathler PC, Lourenço AL, Saito MS, Arêas APG, Rodrigues CR, Cabral LM, Castro HC, Kang HC. The antihemostatic profile of vitamin C: Mechanisms that underlie the technical application of a physiological molecule. Arch Biol Sci [Internet]. 2016Jun.27 [cited 2024May24];68(2):325-31. Available from: https://www.serbiosoc.org.rs/arch/index.php/abs/article/view/774

Issue

Section

Articles

Similar Articles

You may also start an advanced similarity search for this article.